Dedicated to Working Holidaymakers and people willing to immigrate

Saturday, 6 June 2009

Univisas sentenced in the biggest visa scam in the UK‎

An Indian trio – a solicitor and his two wives – have been jailed in London for their alleged involvement in the biggest ever visa scam in the UK.

A city court on Wednesday sentenced Jatinder Kumar Sharma, 44, and his second wife Rakhi Shahi, 31, for seven and eight years respectively for running a fraud firm called Univisas, where they helped hundreds of immigrants apply for visas using bogus documents and false identities.

The court also ordered that they be deported at the end of their sentences.

Another accused Neelam Sharma, Jatinder's first wife, was sentenced for four years.

"The conspiracy concerned a carefully planned professional organisation that continued for two years and would clearly have continued beyond that had the police not acted on what was a smart piece of investigative reporting," Judge McGregor-Johnson at Isleworth Crown Court said.

He said Sharma, who is still listed on the roll of solicitors in this country and possibly in India, was "completely unfitted to be a member of that profession".

The judge hoped that his remarks would be noted by the Solicitors Regulatory Authority.

Police said all the three lived together in Clarence Street, Southall, West London. While Neelam Sharma married Jatinder about 20 years ago, another marriage certificate shows that he recently married Shahi.

Police said both marriages took place in India and the second would be illegal under Indian law.

Jatinder Kumar Sharma received 18 months sentence for stealing ink stamps from companies where he had previously worked. Besides, he was given four years for money laundering, nine months for one charge of deception and 12 months for using a false passport to enter the country.

While Shahi, who received a total of eight years, was sentenced to five years for laundering money and six months for using false documents to enter the country.

However, Neelam, who was given a four-year term for money laundering after being found guilty of handling some of the hundreds of thousands of pounds which poured into their business, was cleared of conspiracy to defraud and immigration offences.

All the sentences will run concurrently.

Police suspect more than 1,000 people, mostly from the Indian sub-continent, used the business to cheat border controls.

However, of the 960 cases, files of which were seized, only 81 clients have been identified and traced, and just 41 have been removed from the country, the court heard.

The Univisas operation was uncovered when a newspaper reporter secretly recorded Sharma offering to supply false documents to him for 4,000 pounds.

Shahi and Jatinder Sharma, who ran the immigration consultancy business, amassed a mountain of 90,000 documents including false university certificates, fraudulent academic records, bogus bank statements and payslips.

They also kept passports, 50 different types of headed notepaper and 150 ink stamps which were all used to create fake documents to support visa applications.

Jatinder and Rakhi are believed to have earned at least three million pounds from their fraud business.

Individuals running one of the London colleges that provided them with sham certificates and diplomas are believed to have been paid nine million pounds for their work.

The court was told that employees at the London School of E-Commerce supplied fraudulent material including degrees, to the criminals.

When the police raided their offices they found evidence that Jatinder planned to move the business to India, where he could operate out of reach of British authorities.

Among the documents seized were false university certificates from India and Pakistan, false academic records from British colleges and fake bank statements and pay slips.

Passing sentence at Isleworth Crown Court in London, Judge Richard McGregor-Johnson said the pair had exploited "weaknesses" in the checks made by the Home Office.

"You saw the weaknesses in those systems and dishonestly exploited them," he said.

The court had earlier heard that Home Office employees had failed to spot that employment certificates from across India were almost identical and wage slips did not add up.

The UK Border Agency, Home Office and office of the Immigration Services Commissioner came under criticism during the case.
*Information is extracted from other web site for self reference only. We are not responsible for any material posted. You can file a complaint here.

Wednesday, 3 June 2009

Indefinite leave to remain success story ILR-0012 (Wp + Hsmp)

Here come some tips from one of the successful applicant

'Last Friday 29 April my family and I were granted ILR at Croydon via the Premium Service. Here is my account of events if anyone is interested. I don't see the pinned SUCCESS STORIES topic that I believe used to be here, so I'll post a new topic. Overall I was quite happy with my experience at Croydon and I did not have any of the problems that others have relayed.

I am an American citizen and entered the UK in June 2004 on a sponsored work permit. I switched to HSMP in 2007 and changed jobs. I applied for ILR for myself, my wife, and my two children (both born here in the UK in the last few years) based on 5 years residency (minus 28 days). My HSMP is valid until October 2009 but I wanted to get this out of the way before the Home Office changes the rules again.

First, it took a couple of days of trying to get an appointment set. As many have reported, you must make the appointment for 6 weeks hence to the day. Once appointments are filled for a day you must call back the next day. I was only able to make my appointmet by starting to call as soon as the lines opened at 9:00 AM. I got the feeling that a family appointment was much more difficult to obtain than a single applicant. My wife and I already passed our Life in the UK test and we had all relevant backup financial information and we had no visa gaps or anything else that would cause concern. We were ready for any potential questions. Once I spoke to someone it was simple to obtain the appointment. It was for 9:00 AM in exactly 6 weeks in Croydon. I did not check other PEO locations.

I arrived at about 8:15 AM as I understood there to be long security lines. There were maybe 5 people ahead of me. It turned out that 4 of them did not have appointments so they were ushered elsewhere. I was asked for my reference number, but I did not have it. They asked if I received a text message, which I did. Nobody asked for any proof. They just waived me through to the metal detector and x-ray machine. Going through was just like any airport experience with the exception of keeping your shoes on. They insist that mobile phone remain turned off, so don't depend on your iPhone or BlackBerry as entertainment during your wait. They also would not let me take my (nearly empty) Starbucks cup of coffee in.

The next line was for the initial check. Again I was asked for a reference number but I couldn't produce it. Nobody seemed to care about that. I was put in the ILR line and I was the only one in it. I waited there about 5 minutes before being called to a window. Again, they asked for the reference number which I didn't have. I gave them all of my documents (see the list at the bottom for the documents they looked at). The clerk typed what seemed to be a huge amount of information in to his computer. He only acknowledged that I had documents and did not examine any of them. This took about 10 minutes. He was satisfied with my documents, so he stamped my application and passed me on to the payment window on the first floor.

There were a number of people in the payment line but it went quickly. I believe there were 4 or 5 clerks taking various payments. I paid by MasterCard via a normal chip-and-pin machine. The clerk gave me a number and said to wait in the area adjoining. I was sat and waiting for my number to be called for my actual appointment by 8:50 AM. There are a number of screens showing number to be called for various queues. For ILR Premium Service your number is called over loudspeaker. The numbers on the screen are irrelevant. I opened a book and was called to a window at about 9:10 AM.

Once at the window I passed through the following documents:
  • Application
  • All passports my family has held since being in the UK (they are validating entry visas)
  • P60s for my entire time in the UK
  • Last 3 months pay slips
  • Last 3 months current account statements (although the clerk looked at only the last months)
  • Letter from my employer stating that I am continuing to work there
  • Birth certificate for my daughter (she was born in the UK and had no visa as yet - needed to verify valid "entry")

I brought several other documents but no others were asked for. This included marriage certificate, previous work permits, council tax bills, etc.

The clerk photocopied a number of my documents and typed a lot of information in to her screen. This took approximately 30 minutes. There was a discrepency between their records of my initial entry and the actual stamp in my passport, but it was only one day. Once she found this she asked for my passports back so she could photocopy all of it. This whole process could have taken more like 15 minutes but the person I was working with seemed to be helping numerous other clerks near her. She also appeared to have a computer issue that delayed things by about 5 minutes while an IT guy worked on her machine. All in all it was painless. She returned everything except my application and my current passports for my family and said to come back in an hour and a half. I only needed the receipt with the number they called to re-enter the building.

I left and walked down to the nearby Croydon high street and browsed the two shopping malls there. Not a bad place to shop! I returned the same way I initially entered after about an hour. I had to go through security again, but was waived in to the waiting area immediately instead of going through the reception and payment queues. I was sat again about an hour and 15 minutes after I left. I waited for about 10 minutes when I was called to the Customer Service window. They asked me to verify that all names and dates were correct in the stamped passports. Once I checked this I left. The whole process was done between 8:15 and 11:15. I was delighted by their ability to keep good time!

My lessons learned (not that I'm going to do this again) are as follows:

-Write down and keep the reference number that you're given when you make your appointment (it just saves having to explain things)
-Take a book and not an electronic device for entertainment while you wait
-Try to get a 9:00 AM appointment and arrive as soon after 8:00 AM as possible so you can get all the admin bits out of the way'

Extracted from UKResident.com
*Information is extracted from other web site for self reference only. We are not responsible for any material posted. You can file a complaint here.

The Path to Citizenship (Probationary Citizenship): Next Steps in Reforming the Immigration System

The government of the United Kingdom has proposed new changes to rules for migrants who wish to attain British citizenship, including a probationary period for new citizens, payments that migrants must pay towards helping communities deal with the impact of increased immigration, and tough measures for prospective citizens who commit offenses.

"Our new deal for citizenship is clear and fair. The rights and benefits of citizenship will be available to those who can demonstrate a commitment to our shared values and a willingness to contribute to the community," said Home Secretary Jacqui Smith.

The changes to citizenship legislation would be backed by a new single piece of legislation that will replace all existing immigration laws, which will be tabled before Parliament in November 2008.

If the naturalization measures are passed into law, they would introduce a 'path to citizenship' which would propose:
  • a three stage path to citizenship, including a new probationary period
  • full access to benefits being delayed until migrants have completed their probationary period
  • a requirement for migrants to improve their English ability (if needed) before completing the probationary period
  • that migrants who commit offenses resulting in prison are barred from citizenship
  • that migrants who commit minor offenses have their probationary period extended
  • that migrants contribute to a new fund for "managing the transitional impacts of migration" and "providing extra financial help to communities experiencing change from migration"
  • that migrants who engage in community volunteer work are able to graduate to British citizenship more quickly
"British people have welcomed migrants over the years. Our economy and our communities are stronger for their contribution to British life. And people think it's fair that the benefits of citizenship are matched by responsibilities and contributions to Britain," Smith said.

Smith said the proposals are part of the "biggest changes to British immigration policy for a generation" which will include a new Australian-style points based system.

'The new rule that is being debated in the Parliament is called 'Pathway to Citizenship'. This will bring radical changes on immigration and settlement issues. For eg, if the rules were to change in 2010, there is a possibility that you will have to go through 'Probationary Citizenship', which could be for 1-3 years and then to apply for Citizenship or ILR. All details of this are on the website of UKBA and it would be advisable to make yourself aware of this and other rules regarding WP, ILR, etc.'

Extracted from WorkPermit
*Information is extracted from other web site for self reference only. We are not responsible for any material posted. You can file a complaint here.

Tuesday, 2 June 2009

Letter From Employer Format for Indefinite leave to remain (ILR-Letter-002 Format)

[On the company letter head]]

[Same company as specified in the certificate of sponsorship / WP approval)




To Whom It May Concern



Re: [Your name] d.o.b [Date of birth]

[Company Name] issued a Certificate of Sponsorship to [Your full name], assigned date [date].

I would confirm that [Your full name] has secure employment now and for the foreseeable future, he has been employed by the company since [Start date]. He currently works under contract to [Client, if any] this contract extends to [Date, if known].

Please contact me directly should you require any further information.



Signed






…………………………………………………..


Extracted from UKResident.com
*Information is extracted from other web site for self reference only. We are not responsible for any material posted. You can file a complaint here.

Commonwealth critzen can vote in the UK for a European Parliament

I just found something very strange, Commonwealth citizen can vote for a European Parliament as long as you having Visa in UK (Student, Working Visa, High Skill Migrant or other).

Unfortunate, you might a bit late because the coming European Parliament vote which is 4th June 2009. Anyway, just register first, so you have a change for next election.

http://www.aboutmyvote.co.uk/default.aspx

Who can register to vote?

You can register to vote if you are:

* 16 years old or over and
* a British citizen
* or an Irish, qualifying Commonwealth or European Union citizen who is resident in the UK

If you are 16 or 17, you can only register if you will be 18 within the lifetime of the electoral register. You cannot vote until you are 18.

Below is a full list of Commonwealth and European Union countries. If you are a citizen of one of these countries, and resident in the UK, you are eligible to register to vote in UK elections. To qualify, Commonwealth citizens must be resident in the UK and either have leave to remain in the UK or not require such leave. The definition of a 'Commonwealth citizen' includes citizens of British Crown Dependencies and British Overseas Territories.

European Union countries
Austria
Belgium
Bulgaria
Cyprus
Czech Republic
Denmark
Estonia
Finland
France
Germany
Greece
Hungary
Ireland
Italy
Latvia
Lithuania
Luxemburg
Malta
Netherlands
Poland
Portugal
Romania
Slovakia
Slovenia
Spain
Sweden
United Kingdom

If you are an EU citizen resident in the UK and wish to vote in the 2009 European Parliamentary elections in the UK, you will need to fill in a European Parliament voter registration form. More details can be found here.

Commonwealth countries
Antigua and Barbuda
Australia
The Bahamas
Bangladesh
Barbados
Belize
Botswana
Brunei Darussalam
Cameroon
Canada
Cyprus
Dominica
Fiji Islands
The Gambia
Ghana
Grenada
Guyana
India
Jamaica
Kenya
Kiribati
Lesotho
Malawi
Malaysia
Maldives
Malta
Mauritius
Mozambique
Namibia
Nauru
New Zealand
Nigeria
Pakistan
Papua New Guinea
St Kitts & Nevis
St Lucia
St Vincent & The Grenadines
Samoa
Seychelles
Sierra Leone
Singapore
Solomon Islands
South Africa
Sri Lanka
Swaziland
United Republic of Tanzania
Tonga
Trinidad & Tobago
Tuvalu
Uganda
United Kingdom
Vanuatu
Zambia
Zimbabwe
*Information is extracted from other web site for self reference only. We are not responsible for any material posted. You can file a complaint here.

Monday, 1 June 2009

ILR Absence Outside Uk Due To Business Need

Question
I am aware of the fact that an individual under Work Permit, HSMP, Tier 1 can stay outside UK for maximum of 6 months in the 5 year period. So, since I am staying outside not more than six months and not more than three month at one go on business reason, would I be ok for future ILR application?

Answer
Only if you can prove that you were out of UK for employment reason. Your employer should issue a letter stating that as well.

Extracted UKResident.com
*Information is extracted from other web site for self reference only. We are not responsible for any material posted. You can file a complaint here.

No recourse to public funds - what does it mean?

What is this about?

If you are allowed to enter the UK for a limited period, one of the conditions attached to your leave may be that you have ‘no recourse to public funds’. This will be stamped in your passport.

Am I allowed to claim public funds?
In most cases you won’t be able to claim any of the benefits, tax credits or housing assistance that count as public funds. Exceptions do apply to some benefits. You can find a list of the most common exceptions further down this leaflet.

If you are in any doubt about whether you are able to claim a particular fund, you should contact the department or agency that issues it. You can find a list of useful contacts at the end of this leaflet.

What happens if I claim funds I am not allowed to receive?
There are very serious consequences if you illegitimately claim any type of benefit or support that counts as a public fund. Unless you are receiving a fund under one of the exceptions set out below, claiming public funds is a breach of your conditions of entry to the UK.

Breaching your conditions of entry is a criminal offence. It may mean that your leave to remain in the UK comes to an end. You may also have applications for further or indefinite leave refused.

What about other benefits and public services?
Only the forms of support listed above count as public funds. Public funds do not include the following work-related benefits, which are based on National Insurance contributions:
• contribution-based jobseeker’s allowance
• incapacity benefit
• retirement pension
• widows benefit and bereavement benefit
• guardian’s allowance
• statutory maternity pay

Healthcare and education also do not count as public funds – although your immigration status may affect whether you are eligible for them.

Do any exceptions apply to housing assistance?
Two types of housing assistance count as public funds:
• An allocation of housing, or grant of a licence or tenancy, by a local housing authority –
for example, through the ‘housing waiting list’.
• Housing assistance under homelessness legislation.

However, there are other types of housing assistance that do not count as public funds:
• Housing provided directly by housing associations. These are independent organisations and are separate from local housing authorities.
• Housing provided by Key Worker Housing schemes.
• Housing provided by your employer – for example, if you are a nurse and you are living in housing provided by the local NHS Trust. If you receive any of these types of support, it will not count as recourse to public funds.

Do any exceptions apply to benefits?
In most cases you will not be able to claim any of the benefits or tax credits that count as public funds. However, for some funds there are exceptions to this. If you receive a fund under one of these exceptions, it will not count as recourse to public funds.

The most common exceptions are listed below.
a) I’m a member of the family of an EEA national - am I eligible for any benefits?
If you are living with another family member who is an EEA national – for example, yourchild or your partner – you may be eligible forthe following benefits:
• Child benefit
• A social fund payment
• Attendance allowance
• Severe disablement allowance
• Carer’s allowance
• Disability living allowance

b) My partner is allowed to claim tax credits - can I claim them too?
Claims for child and working tax credits are assessed jointly. If you are living with a spouse or partner who is allowed to claim tax credits, your name may be included in the claim. Other benefits classed as public funds are assessed individually.

c) My home country has a social security agreement with the UK or the EU - am I eligible for any benefits?
If your home country has a social security agreement with the EU or UK, you may be eligible for certain benefits.
If you are from Turkey, Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia or San Marino, you may be eligible for
the following funds.
• Child tax credit
• Child benefit
• Income-based jobseeker’s allowance
• Income support
• A social fund payment
• Housing benefit
• Council tax benefit
If you are from Barbados, Canada, Israel, Mauritius, New Zealand, Croatia, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Serbia and Montenegro or the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, you may be eligible for the following benefits:
• Child benefit
• A social fund payment
• Attendance allowance
• Severe disablement allowance
• Carer’s allowance
• Disability living allowance

d) I’ve been awarded tax credits in error - will this affect my leave?
If you applied for child or working tax credits before January 2005, Her Majesty’s Revenue and Customs (HMRC) may have paid you them in error. If so, HMRC will stop the payment. Any tax credits you did receive before the error was corrected will not count as recourse to public funds.

e) I’ve been affected by a temporary loss of funds from abroad – am I eligible for any benefits?
If you are temporarily without funds, due to disruption of remittances from abroad, you may be eligible for the following funds:
• Child tax credits
• Working tax credits
• Income-based jobseeker’s allowance
• Income support
• A social fund payment
• Housing benefit
• Council tax benefit

These benefits and tax credits will only be awarded if there is a reasonable expectation that the supply of funds will be resumed. They will only be paid for a short period. A claim can only be made once during any period of leave.

More details
What is public funds

Extracted from UK Border Agency
*Information is extracted from other web site for self reference only. We are not responsible for any material posted. You can file a complaint here.

Benefits of Indefinite Leave To Remain, Permanent Residency & British Citizenship

This page explains what public funds are and whether you are able to receive help from them while you are living in the United Kingdom.

If you have a residence permit that allows you to live in the United Kingdom, it may include the condition that you have no recourse to public funds. If so, it means you will not be able to claim most benefits, tax credits or housing assistance that are paid by the state.

However, there are exceptions for some benefits and if you are in any doubt, you should contact the department or agency that issues it. This will often be the Department for Work and Pensions or HM Revenue & Customs.

Public funds include a range of benefits that are given to people on a low income, as well as housing support. These are:

* income-based jobseeker's allowance;
* income support;
* child tax credit;
* working tax credit;
* a social fund payment;
* child benefit;
* housing benefit;
* council tax benefit;
* state pension credit;
* attendance allowance;
* severe disablement allowance;
* carer's allowance;
* disability living allowance;
* an allocation of local authority housing; and
* local authority homelessness assistance.

Public funds do not include benefits that are based on National Insurance contributions. National Insurance is paid in the same way as income tax and is based on earnings. Benefits to which a person is entitled as a result of National Insurance contributions include:

* contribution-based jobseeker's allowance;
* incapacity benefit;
* retirement pension;
* widow's benefit and bereavement benefit;
* guardian's allowance; and
* statutory maternity pay.

More details about No recourse to public funds - what does it mean?

Extracted from UK Border Agency
*Information is extracted from other web site for self reference only. We are not responsible for any material posted. You can file a complaint here.

Sunday, 31 May 2009

Indefinite leave to remain success story Tier1-0008 (HSMP + Tier 1)

This story is based on one of the applicant of Tier 1 (General)

Apply Method: Sheffield PEO Interview
Apply Date: 18th of May 2009
Previous Visa: 4 years HSMP + 1 year Tier 1

'Hi,

I went to Sheffield PEO on the 18th of May and the caseworker retained all our documents pending new guidlines to be published on the 20th May.

The lady cheked all our documents and handed over a letter to me with her name and email on the letter. She said that she will process the application when the new guidlines are published.

When the new guidlines were published on the 20th, i sent her an email and requested urgent processing of my application as i paid for premium service. She was kind enough and replied the next day and told me that my ILR has been successful and she posted my documents by special delivery the next day.

I suggest you contact the case worker if you got an email and request urgent processing of your application. I am still awaiting to receive my refund and letter of confirmation that i am entitled for nationality.

I was on HSMP for 4 years and then Tier 1. Have completed 5 years now.

X'

Extracted from UKresident.com
*Information is extracted from other web site for self reference only. We are not responsible for any material posted. You can file a complaint here.

Advice on buying a vehicle In the UK

When you buy a new vehicle, do you really check what it is that you are buying? There are many stolen vehicles that are ‘disguised’ to make you believe you are buying the correct make and model. Here are a few tips you can consider when buying your next vehicle.

Seeing the vehicle for the first time

Make sure the seller either owns the vehicle, or is able to offer it for sale and consider the following:

* be careful of mobile phone numbers - it’s very hard to find their owners
* watch out for adverts giving a phone number and time to call - it could be a phone box
* arrange to see the vehicle in daylight at the seller’s home and not in a public place
* make sure the seller is familiar with the vehicle and its controls

What to look for when you check the vehicle

Make sure the vehicle’s identity and documents are correct. Satisfy yourself that everything is in order.

Check how the vehicle looks

Have a good look at the vehicle and be sure you are happy with its condition. Think about the following:

* see if the engine has been changed in any way
* check all the locks open with the same key - thieves will change locks that have been damaged
* check for signs of a forced entry
* see if the locking petrol cap has been forced or replaced

Checking the vehicle’s identity

When you decide what make and model you are interested in, find out where the vehicle identification number (VIN) is on that vehicle. You will then know where to look and check it’s correct. Also check:

* the VIN matches the one on the vehicle registration certificate (V5C)
* the surrounding area for signs of damage or alterations
* the part VIN or registration number etched on the windows matches the ones on the registration certificate and number plates
* all window etchings match each other including headlamps, tail lamps and sunroofs
* the engine number matches that on the registration certificate
* underneath stickers, where fitted – they can be used to conceal etchings

If the number is not on the vehicle, ask why not.

The vehicle has a ‘Q’ registration number

A ‘Q’ registration number means:

* the age or identity of the vehicle is not known
* the vehicle may have been rebuilt from old or new parts
* the vehicle may have been imported without proof of the vehicles age

The registration certificate should say why the vehicle has been registered with a ‘Q’ registration number.

The vehicle’s registration certificate

If you decide to buy a vehicle make sure the person selling it has the right to do so as the registration certificate isn’t proof that they own the vehicle.

Make sure you have the registration certificate and it matches the vehicle’s details.

Check the registration certificate and satisfy yourself that it is real. By holding it up to the light you can see the DVLA watermark in it. You can also phone DVLA on 0870 241 1878 to check the registration certificate is real before you buy.

Be on the lookout for stolen registration certificates. DVLA has provided a range of serial numbers of known stolen registration certificates. If you find one that is in the range of BG8229501 to BG9999030 or BI2305501 to BI2800000 do not proceed with the sale and contact the police.

If you can’t find a serial number or it looks like it has been altered or tampered with, or the vehicle is accompanied by only part of the registration certificate you should not go ahead with the sale.

Get someone else to check the vehicle for you

To help you decide whether to buy the vehicle you can also consider:

* taking an independent, qualified examiner with you to see the vehicle
* checking the vehicle's details by phoning DVLA on 0870 241 1878
* making enquiries with private vehicle check companies to ensure there is no outstanding finance on the vehicle

More information
Vehicle Crime Advice
Stolen V5C certificate warning
DVLA V5C Registration Certificate


Extracted from Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency
*Information is extracted from other web site for self reference only. We are not responsible for any material posted. You can file a complaint here.

How to notify DVLA if you buy a used vehicle

The seller will usually notify the Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency (DVLA) that you have purchased your vehicle. The way in which the vehicle is registered to you will depend if it is new or used, if a registration document or certificate is available or you may register it yourself.

If you buy a used vehicle - registration document or certificate available

The way in which the DVLA is notified that you have purchased your vehicle will depend on the registration document or certificate available.

-Two part registration document V5

You should be given the top half when you purchase the vehicle. You must tell DVLA as soon as you buy a used vehicle - do not wait until you need to re-license it. Tell DVLA by completing the back of the registration document.

-Three part registration document V5

The person selling the vehicle must complete 'your details' in the top (blue) section. Both you and the seller need to sign the declaration. It is the responsibility of the person selling the vehicle to send it in to DVLA. They should then hand you the V5/2 green section appropriately filled in. The DVLA must be notified as soon as the vehicle changes hands.

-Registration certificate V5C

The person selling the vehicle must complete section 6 'new keeper or new name/new address details' of the V5C. Both you and the seller need to sign the declaration in section 8. It is the responsibility of the person selling the vehicle to send it in to DVLA. They should then hand you the V5C/2 green section appropriately filled in. The DVLA must be notified as soon as the vehicle changes hands.

If you buy a used vehicle - seller does not have a registration document or certificate

If the seller does not have a V5 registration document or V5C registration certificate, you should register the vehicle in your name by using form V62 'application for a registration certificate'. You can get one by download from the vehicle forms link below or from any Post Office® branch or a DVLA local office. DVLA will then send you a new registration certificate in your name.

What will happen next

DVLA will aim to deliver a registration certificate to you within two to four weeks of receiving the application. If you have applied on a V62 application form, this may take up to six weeks as special checks have to be made. Please allow six weeks for the registration certificate to be delivered before contacting the DVLA.

When you receive your new registration certificate

When you receive your registration certificate from DVLA, it is your responsibility to check that all the details are correct.
*Information is extracted from other web site for self reference only. We are not responsible for any material posted. You can file a complaint here.

Vauxhall Corsa Show Me Tell Me - UK Driving Test

Picture with labels for practical driving test














Extract from Showmetell.me
*Information is extracted from other web site for self reference only. We are not responsible for any material posted. You can file a complaint here.

Toyota 207 Show Me Tell Me - UK Driving Test

Picture with labels for practical driving test












Extract from Showmetell.me
*Information is extracted from other web site for self reference only. We are not responsible for any material posted. You can file a complaint here.

Renault Clio Show Me Tell Me - UK Driving Test

Picture with labels for practical driving test














Extract from Showmetell.me
*Information is extracted from other web site for self reference only. We are not responsible for any material posted. You can file a complaint here.

Peugeot 308 Show Me Tell Me - UK Driving Test

Picture with labels for practical driving test












Extract from Showmetell.me
*Information is extracted from other web site for self reference only. We are not responsible for any material posted. You can file a complaint here.

Peugeot 207 Show Me Tell Me - UK Driving Test

Picture with labels for practical driving test














Extract from Showmetell.me
*Information is extracted from other web site for self reference only. We are not responsible for any material posted. You can file a complaint here.

Mini Cooper S Show Me Tell Me - UK Driving Test

Picture with labels for practical driving test















Extract from Showmetell.me
*Information is extracted from other web site for self reference only. We are not responsible for any material posted. You can file a complaint here.

Ford Fiesta Show Me Tell Me - UK Driving Test

Picture with labels for practical driving test














Extract from Showmetell.me
*Information is extracted from other web site for self reference only. We are not responsible for any material posted. You can file a complaint here.

Fiat 500 Show Me Tell Me - UK Driving Test

Labels for practical driving test


Extract from Showmetell.me
*Information is extracted from other web site for self reference only. We are not responsible for any material posted. You can file a complaint here.

UK Driving Test - Show and Tell (Questions & Answers)

Show and Tell

In the practical test, you will be asked two 'show and tell' questions about safety and maintenance checks on your car. Getting one or both of them wrong will count as a driving fault in your test.

To help prepare you can play our interactive Show me tell me game (link opens a new window), or study the typical questions and answers below.

'Tell me' questions

Q1: Open the bonnet, identify where you would check the engine oil level and tell me how you would check that the engine has sufficient oil.

A: Identify dipstick/oil level indicator, describe check of oil level against the minimum/maximum markers.

Q2: Open the bonnet, identify where you would check the engine coolant level and tell me how you would check that the engine has the correct level.

A: Identify high/low level markings on header tank (where fitted) or radiator filler cap, and describe how to top up to correct level.

Q3: Identify where the windscreen washer reservoir is, and tell me how you would check the windscreen washer level.

A: Identify reservoir and explain how to check level. Check your car's manual to see how to do this.

Q4: Open the bonnet, identify where the brake fluid reservoir is, and tell me how you would check that you have a safe level of hydraulic brake fluid.

A: Identify reservoir, check level against high/low markings.

Q5: Tell me how you would check that the brake lights are working on this car.

A: Operate brake pedal, make use of reflections in windows, garage doors etc, or ask someone to help.

Q6: Tell me how you would check that the brakes are working before starting a journey.

A: Brakes should not feel spongy or slack. Brakes should be tested as you set off. Vehicle should not pull to one side.

Person checking tyres and tightening wheel bolt Q7: Tell me where you would find the information for the recommended tyre pressures for this car and how tyre pressures should be checked.

A: Manufacturer's guide, use a reliable pressure gauge, check and adjust pressures when tyres are cold, don't forget spare tyre, remember to refit valve caps.

Q8: Tell me how you would check the tyres to ensure that they have sufficient tread depth and that their general condition is safe to use on the road.

A: No cuts and bulges, 1.6mm of tread depth across the central ¾ of the breadth of the tyre and around the entire outer circumference.

'Show me' questions

Q9: Show me/explain how you would check that the power-assisted steering is working before starting a journey.

A: If the steering becomes heavy the system may not be working properly. Before starting a journey two simple checks can be made. Gentle pressure on the steering wheel, maintained while the engine is started, should result in a slight but noticeable movement as the system begins to operate.

Alternatively, turning the steering wheel just after moving off will give an immediate indication that the power assistance is functioning.

Q10: Show me how you would check that the headlights and tail lights are working.

A: Operate switch (turn on ignition if necessary), walk round vehicle.

Q11: Show me how you would check that the direction indicators are working.

A: Applying the indicators or hazard warning switch and walking around the vehicle to check functioning of all indicators.

Q12: Show me how you would check that the horn is working (off-road only).

A: Check is carried out by using the control (turn on ignition if necessary).

Q13: Show me how you would check the parking brake for excessive wear.

A: Demonstrate by applying parking brake that when it is fully applied it secures itself, and is not at the end of the working travel.
What questions can you expect on your test?

Your examiner will ask you one 'show me' and one 'tell me' question, usually in the following combinations:

Q 1 and 9
Q 1 and 10
Q 2 and 10
Q 2 and 13

Q 3 and 12
Q 4 and 9
Q 4 and 11
Q 5 and 13

Q 6 and 10
Q 7 and 11
Q 8 and 10
Q 8 and 12
*Information is extracted from other web site for self reference only. We are not responsible for any material posted. You can file a complaint here.

  Searching any post in our Websites?
.